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Gray Hair – Why Does Hair Turn Gray?

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Gray Hair – Why Does Hair Turn Gray?

Have you ever watched someone try to cover up gray hair by dyeing it? Or maybe you wonder why your granddad has a full head of silver hair when in old pictures it used to be dark brown? Getting gray, silver, or white hair is a natural part of growing older, and here’s why.

Each hair on our heads is made up of two parts:

  • a shaft – the colored part we see growing out of our heads
  • a root – the bottom part, which keeps the hair anchored under the scalp

The root of every strand of hair is surrounded by a tube of tissue under the skin that is called the hair follicle (say: fah-lih-kul). Each hair follicle contains a certain number of pigment cells. These pigment cells continuously produce a chemical called melanin (say: meh-luh-nin) that gives the growing shaft of hair its color of brown, blonder, red, and anything in between.

Melanin is the same stuff that makes our skin’s color fair or darker. It also helps determine whether a person will burn or tan in the sun. The dark or light color of someone’s hair depends on how much melanin each hair contains.

As we get older, the pigment cells in our hair follicles gradually die. When there are fewer pigment cells in a hair follicle, that strand of hair will no longer contain as much melanin and will become a more transparent color – like gray, silver, or white – as it grows. As people continue to get older, fewer pigment cells will be around to produce melanin. Eventually, the hair will look completely gray.

People can get gray hair at any age. Some people go gray at a young age – as early as when they are in high school or college – whereas others may be in their 30s or 40s before they see that first gray hair. How early we get gray hair is determined by our genes. This means that most of us will start having gray hairs around the same age that our parents or grandparents first did.

Gray hair is more noticeable in people with darker hair because it stands out, but people with naturally lighter hair are just as likely to go gray. From the time a person notices a few gray hairs, it may take more than 10 years for all of that person’s hair to turn gray.

Some people think that a big shock or trauma can turn a person’s hair white or gray overnight, but scientists don’t really believe that this happens. Just in case, try not to freak out your parents too much. You don’t want to be blamed for any of their gray hairs!

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Hair Loss – Baldness – Hair Loss | 脱发 | Rambut Gugur

Hair Loss -  Baldness – Hair Loss | 脱发 | Rambut Gugur,    Hair & Trend Show by Michael Poh, Hair loss, hair type, hair loss hair hair loss 3 minit, alopecia BF1, hair care, hair salon, hair salon, hair stylist hair loss, hair loss pictures, hair loss knowledge, information, hair loss , hair loss network, hair release, loss of hair, loss of hair in between, causing loss of hair, scalp hair loss, hair loss life diet hair loss, hair loss habits, genetic hair loss, hair loss factor

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Hair Loss – Baldness

– Hair Loss | 脱发 | Rambut Gugur

Baldness involves the state of lacking hair where it often grows, especially on the head. The most common form of baldness is a progressive hair thinning condition called androgenic alopecia or “male pattern baldness” that occurs in adult male humans and other species. The amount and patterns of baldness can vary greatly; it ranges from male and female pattern alopecia (androgenic alopecia, also called androgenetic alopecia or alopecia androgenetica), alopecia areata, which involves the loss of some of the hair from the head, and alopecia totalis, which involves the loss of all head hair, to the most extreme form, alopecia universalis, which involves the loss of all hair from the head and the body.

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Hair Loss – Background, cause and incidence

The average human head has about 100,000 hair follicles. Each follicle will grow an average of about 20 individual hairs in a person’s lifetime. Average hair loss is about 100 strands a day.

Incidence of pattern baldness varies from population to population based on genetic background. Environmental factors do not seem to affect this type of baldness greatly. One large scale study in Maryborough, Victoria, Australia showed the prevalence of mid-frontal hair loss increases with age and affects 57% of women and 73.5% of men aged 80 and over. According to Medem Medical Library’s website, male pattern baldness affects roughly 40 million men in the United States. Approximately 25 percent of men begin balding by age 30; two-thirds begin balding by age 60.

Male pattern is characterized by hair receding from the lateral sides of the forehead, known as “receding hairline”. Receding hairlines are usually seen in males above the ages of 25 but can be seen as early as mid-teens.

An additional bald patch may develop on top (vertex). The trigger for this type of baldness (called androgenetic alopecia) is DHT, a powerful sex hormone, body, and facial hair growth promoter that can adversely affect the hair on the head as well as the prostate.

The mechanism by which DHT accomplishes this is not yet understood. In genetically-prone scalps, DHT initiates a process of follicular miniaturization. Through the process of follicular miniaturization, hair shaft width is progressively decreased until scalp hair resembles fragile vellus hair or “peach fuzz” or else becomes non-existent. Onset of hair loss sometimes begins as early as end of puberty, and is mostly genetically determined. Male pattern baldness is classified on the Hamilton-Norwood scale I-VII.

It was previously believed that baldness was inherited from the maternal grandfather. While there is some basis for this belief, both parents contribute to their offspring’s likelihood of hair loss. Most likely, inheritance is technically “autosomal dominant with mixed penetrance” (see ‘baldness folklore’ below)

There are several other kinds of baldness:

  • Traction alopeciais most commonly found in people with ponytails or cornrows who pull on their hair with excessive force.
  • Trichotillomania is the loss of hair caused by compulsive pullingand bending of the hairs. It tends to occur more in children than in adults. In this condition the hairs are not absent from the scalp but are broken. Where they break near the scalp they cause typical, short, “exclamation mark” hairs.
  • Traumas such as chemotherapy, childbirth, major surgery, poisoning, and severe stress may cause a hair loss condition known as telogen effluvium.
  • Worrisome hair loss often follows childbirth without causing actual baldness. In this situation, the hair is actually thicker during pregnancy due to increased circulating oestrogens. After the baby is born, the oestrogen levels fall back to normal pre-pregnancy levels and the additional hair foliage drops out. A similar situation occurs in women taking the fertility-stimulating drug clomiphene.
  • Iron deficiencyis a common cause of thinning of the hair, though frank baldness is not usually seen.
  • Radiation to the scalp, as happens when radiotherapy is applied to the head for the treatment of certain cancers there, can cause baldness of the irradiated areas.
  • Some mycotic infections can cause massive hair loss.
  • Alopecia areatais an autoimmune disorder also known as “spot baldness” that can result in hair loss ranging from just one location (Alopecia areata monolocularis) to every hair on the entire body (Alopecia areata universalis).
  • Localized or diffuse hair loss may also occur in cicatricialalopecia (lupus erythematosus, lichen plano pilaris, folliculitis decalvans, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, postmenopausal frontal fibrosing alopecia, etc.). Tumours and skin outgrowths also induce localized baldness (sebaceous nevus, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma).
  • Hypothyroidismcan cause hair loss, typically frontal, and is particularly associated with thinning of the outer third of the eyebrows (syphilis also can cause loss of the outer third of the eyebrows)
  • Hyperthyroidism can also cause hair loss, which is parietal rather than frontal.
  • Temporary loss of hair can occur in areas where sebaceous cysts are present for considerable duration; normally one to several weeks in length.

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Hair Loss – Evolutionary theories of male pattern baldness

There is no consensus regarding the details of the evolution of male pattern baldness. A number of other primate species also experience hair loss following puberty, and some primate species use an enlarged forehead, created both anatomically and through strategies such as frontal balding, to convey increased status and maturity. The assertion that MPB is intended to convey a social message is supported by the fact that the distribution of androgen receptors in the scalp differs between men and women, and older women or women with high androgen levels often exhibit diffuse thinning of hair as opposed to male pattern baldness.

One theory, advanced by Muscarella and Cunningham, suggests baldness evolved in males through sexual selection as an enhanced signal of aging and social maturity, whereby aggression and risk-taking decrease and nurturing behaviours increase. This may have conveyed a male with enhanced social status but reduced physical threat, which could enhance ability to secure reproductive partners and raise offspring to adulthood.

In a study by hector by Muscarella and Cunnhingham, males and females viewed 6 male models with different levels of facial hair (beard and mustache or clean) and cranial hair (full head of hair, receding and bald). Participants rated each combination on 32 adjectives related to social perceptions. Males with facial hair and those with bald or receding hair were rated as being older than those who were clean-shaven or had a full head of hair. Beards and a full head of hair were seen as being more aggressive and less socially mature, and baldness was associated with more social maturity. A review of social perceptions of male pattern baldness has been provided by Henss (2001) .

Other evolutionary hypotheses include genetic linkage to beneficial traits unrelated to hair loss and genetic drift.

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Man Hair Loss – Hair Loss | 脱发 | Rambut Gugur

Man Hair Loss – Hair Loss | 脱发 | Rambut Gugur,Hair & Trend Show by Michael Poh, Hair loss, hair type, hair loss hair hair loss 3 minit, alopecia BF1, hair care, hair salon, hair salon, hair stylist hair loss, hair loss pictures, hair loss knowledge, information, hair loss , hair loss network, hair release, loss of hair, loss of hair in between, causing loss of hair, scalp hair loss, hair loss life diet hair loss, hair loss habits, genetic hair loss, hair loss factor

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Man Hair Loss

– Hair Loss | 脱发 | Rambut Gugur

It is very common for most man to find themselves dealing with hair loss at some point in time. This is the most known type of hair loss. Man deal with this problem more than woman because of their sensitivity to male sex hormones in certain parts of their scalp. This may be passed down from generation to generation.

Many man feel that baldness makes them look unattractive and can get stressed out from the situation. There are some men however, that feels distinguished by their hair loss and feels better about them. There are even men who like to keep their head shaved even when they have a full head of hair. It is easier for them to take care of and it makes them look and feel sexy.

Some men do have the area on their head that are very sensitive to their hormones and will make male hair loss present. The hormones will make the hair follicles from where the hair grows to shrink. They will start to become so small that they cannot replace lost hair. These follicles are still alive and will be no longer able to do their job. It is at this point when men loose their hair.

This sort of condition will start in men anywhere from their late twenties to there thirties. Male hair loss may start with just a receding hairline and then gradually move to the top of the head. The hair will start to thin and become noticeable.

Male hair loss that is passed on genetically cannot be prevented. It is going to happen, although there is some forms of treatment that can help slow it down or even help the hair grow back faster. There are some side effects to deal with when you use these forms of treatment.

It is probably a good idea to take vitamins early so that you maybe you can prevent the balding from happening any earlier than expected. Vitamin A and E are great for the hair and will help to make it stronger and it may even start to grow in more.

It is a good idea to accept the inevitable and just learn to be comfortable with male hair loss. There is no reason to try and hide it or disguise your baldness. The occasional hat once in a while is fine, but you should not run out and buy a hairpiece right away. Give it some time, you may just like the way you look and feel with the thinning hair. If not, then you can look into hair replacement therapy. You can have a hair transplant to fill in the gaps where your hair is becoming thin.

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